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Tips

We asked our community for their tips on how they navigate relationships with employers and colleagues with IBD and/or Ostomy

  • “The hardest part, I thought, would be telling my employer, but they were extremely supportive. If I told them I wasn’t feeling good instead of making me go home and use up my sick leave they allowed me to work from home.”
  • “I think it’s important to know that you don’t have to disclose anything to your direct supervisor, other than that you have a disability [IBD and ostomies are legally protected disabilities] and need accommodations. You can share specifics with HR and your boss is not allowed to ask for diagnosis or any details. Any doctor’s notes can go through HR rather than your boss, since HR is responsible for providing accommodations that you are legally entitled to, at least in the US.”
  • “I put promotional stuff on my desk and I’m open about my treatments too. I also brought up with my employer about awareness days/weeks and asked if I could do a presentation. I found out 3 other people in the office had a close relative with IBD. Not everyone wants to be super approachable but I found it great to be able to answer questions”

Resources

Blog posts about working with IBD and/or Ostomy

FMLA

In the United States, the Family and Medical Leave Act allows patients and/or caregivers to access unpaid time off and preserve both employment and benefits. Check out our blog about FMLA and how to obtain it:

Disability Inclusion at work

Disability

For some of our members, disability is needed when the ability to work is negatively impacted by illness. The following blogs are about the emotional process of becoming disabled and tips for applying for disability benefits with Ulcerative Colitis. We plan to continue expanding our disability content, so be sure to follow our social media channels for more.

We can help you navigate all of your life stages.

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